African Growth Pt. II: The View of the World Bank and the Brookings Institution

Africa in DC

While the South Africa Minister of Finance was the primary speaker at the Brookings Institution’s April 17 event on “Inequality and Inclusive Growth in Africa”, Shanta Devarajan, the Chief Economist for Africa at the World Bank and Homi Kharas, the Deputy Director of the Global Economy and Development program at the Brookings Institution were also present.  While Mr. Kharas made some very insightful comments I was thoroughly displeased my Mr. Devarajan’s approach (although to be fair, the Finance Minister took up the vast majority of the time so I do not have to much material to evaluate the others).

Following Minister Gordhan’s remarks, Homi Kharas posed some very concerning questions about Africa’s growth.  While the statistics point to

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TechCrunch

Back in September 2011, Farmigo took the stage at TechCrunch Disrupt and launched its site for discovering and enrolling in Community Supported Agriculture programs (where you can sign up to receive boxes of fresh produce from local farms). Ultimately, however, founder and CEO Benzi Ronen told me the CSA model only works for “1 percent of the population,” while the company’s mission is to make “healthy, fresh food available to everyone.”

That’s why Farmigo has launched a new program called local food communities. It has been piloting the idea with a few companies in San Francisco and New York, and as of today, organizations such as offices, schools, and community centers in those two cities (and more soon) can sign up. The goal, Ronen said, is to take the farmer’s market concept and make it much more accessible, so that it isn’t just open for a few hours on the…

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Indian Air Force to induct first killer drones

Firangi on India - भारत पर विदेशी दृष्टिकोण

On 04OCT12, the Economic Times, among others reported on the IAF’s plans of inducting the Israeli made Harup loitering munitions system into its ranks. (The UCAV is also known as the Harpy-2 loitering munitions missile, as the drone loiters over the battlefield and attacks the targets by self-destructing into them.)

“The UCAV are expected to join us by next year enhancing our firepower in both conventional and low intensity conflict,” a senior IAF official told reporters of PTI.

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Soy and Aquaculture

RCS

 

Posted by Erin Tindell, Foreign Agricultural Service Public Affairs Specialist, on October 3, 2012 at 1:58 PM

 

Workers hold a net full of tilapia at a fish farm in Pakistan. The fish are part of the American Soybean Association’s (ASA) World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program called “FEEDing Pakistan.” The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) helped fund the program, which aims to enhance the country’s growing aquaculture sector through trial fish feeding using high–protein, floating fish feed produced from U.S. soybean meal. (Courtesy World Initiative for Soy in Human Health)Workers hold a net full of tilapia at a fish farm in Pakistan. The fish are part of the American Soybean Association’s (ASA) World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program called “FEEDing Pakistan.” The Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) helped fund the program, which aims to enhance the country’s growing aquaculture sector through trial fish feeding using high–protein, floating fish feed produced from U.S. soybean meal. (Courtesy World Initiative for Soy in Human Health)

An innovative Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS)-funded program in Pakistan is not only improving local diets, but is creating jobs, training workers and helping create a thriving aquaculture industry with U.S. soy.

The American Soybean Association’s (ASA) World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) program began a three-year program last September called “FEEDing Pakistan.”…

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Report: For The First Time In Decades, US Is Bleeding High-Skilled Immigrants

TechCrunch

“The period of unprecedented expansion of immigrant-led entrepreneurship that characterized the 1980s and 1990s has come to a close,” writes an ominous new Kauffman Foundation report from Stanford researcher and Washington Post columnist, Vivek Wadhwa.

He and his team of researchers are finding that, despite being the source of venerable American businesses, from Carnegie to Google, immigrants no longer see the United States as the only land of dreams, driven in large part by Congress’s inability to enact high-skill friendly immigration reform. In the words of immigrant and President of Xerox’s Innovation Group Sophie Vandebroek, with whom Wadhwa spoke for his new book, Immigrant Exodus“Clearly the attraction the United States had on people like myself two to three decades ago is very different now. Countries all over the globe now have successful and growing research universities and labs.”

Both Wadhwa’s book and accompanying report continue his seminal research…

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